Remi’s Blog

A New Way to Save Coral Reefs

Posted by on Apr 12, 2016 in Remi's Blog | 0 comments

Scientists believe that they found a way to help preserve coral reefs that are endangered by acidifying oceans. Their solution is simple: bubbles. They think that blowing bubbles on coral reefs will help with the chemicals in the ocean. Oxygen bubbling has been used in lakes to break up thermal stratification, but it has never been used on an ocean...

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Colorado – The Inland Ocean (Youth Guest Blog)

Posted by on Apr 12, 2016 in Remi's Blog, TopStory | 0 comments

Local youth and river/ocean lover, Grace, recently interviewed the Colorado Ocean Coalition’s founder, Vicki Nichols Goldstein, to discuss her organization and the reasons why an inland community can affect the health of our oceans.  Colorado – The Inland Ocean By: Grace C. An ocean in Colorado? Well, we are all downstream. In Colorado, we have a special responsibility when it comes to protecting water quality. That’s because we’re a “headwater state,” which means that the snowfall in our mountains is a major source of water for eighteen states and parts of Mexico. (Colorado the Headwater State) I had the chance to go to the Making WAVES conference and learn about what the Colorado Ocean Coalition (COCO) is doing to help not only our water, but the water that flows to other states and eventually the ocean. In fact, Colorado is so important that Rep. Mark Stone from California named Boulder a ‘California Inland Ocean Community.’ Vicki Goldstein from COCO says that, “The health of the ocean is connected to the health of our rivers and waterways. By being good stewards of the water that we have we make the ocean and the planet better places too.” The truth is, no matter where you live your day to day activities end up having an effect on not only your local water supply, but the waters downstream and eventually the ocean. At the conference I had the privilege to listen to people who love the ocean give lectures about how we can help it. I learned a few things I didn’t know before, like what really happens to plastic in the ocean, how to make trash into art, how to reduce plastic pollution and how I can help the ocean. One amazing opportunity that I had at the conference was to hear and meet Mr. Fabien Cousteau, grandson of the legendary Jacques Cousteau. Mr. Cousteau talked about his Mission 31 and his organization called Plant a Fish which strives to help people protect and marvel at the world around them. His lecture was all about protecting the ocean, “planting marine life and plants in ecologically stressed areas and educating local communities about the ocean.” (Cousteau) I also heard Stephanie from Green Apple Supply talk about plastics in the ocean. Plastic, once thought to take thousands of years to break down, actually breaks down quite fast in the warm ocean water, but it doesn’t go away completely. Instead it turns into tiny bits of plastic that fish eat and then they die, sea birds also eat the plastic as well as larger marine fish and mammals. The plastic can get so bad that it disrupts algae and plankton growth and that makes the whole food web go out of balance. But, plastic is not the only culprit that makes it to the ocean from our water supply. A lot of chemicals and microbeads make their way into our local watershed. Chemicals from pills we take and things we put into our lawns get flushed into the system. Microbeads, which are found in bath and beauty products, also get flushed or washed into the system. The sewage treatment plants are not equipped to take out all of these chemicals and plastic pollution and it ends up getting washed downstream to the next community. If you think that a few pills and microbeads here and there don’t add up, Mrs. Goldstein from COCO has this to say, “The water quality gets worse as it flows downstream. 5,000 square miles at Gulf of Mexico is a dead zone, that is the end of our watershed. This means that nothing lives...

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Exploding Whales?

Posted by on Feb 29, 2016 in Remi's Blog | 0 comments

In the small town of Trout River, Newfoundland, experts are trying to find a way to dispose of a dead beached blue whale. The whale weighs 380,000 pounds. If the gas builds up, the whale will explode. So far, the experts say that the gas is naturally deflating. However no one knows if the whale will...

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A Plastic Ocean

Posted by on Feb 7, 2016 in Remi's Blog | 0 comments

Check out this trailer for a new movie concerning ocean conservation!  https://www.facebook.com/aplasticoceanfilm/videos/vb.193393784345701/199902603694819/?type=2&theater

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One young mind is solving the ocean’s biggest problem

Posted by on Jan 29, 2016 in Remi's Blog | 0 comments

Check out what this 21-year-old man is doing to help save the ocean! Watch the video to see how he is tackling a problem that is world-wide. https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/videos/10153859481609060/

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